Finger pressing computer key with abstract depiction of data emanating out

Call for Code

Coding for Justice

Call for Code is the largest tech-for-good initiative of its kind, with over 400,000 developers from 179 countries creating open source solutions since 2018 to address natural disasters, climate change and COVID-19.

Call for Code for Racial Justice, announced in 2020, invited this powerful network of innovators to apply their skills toward combating the challenge of racial injustice across three focus areas: police and judicial reform and accountability, diverse representation, and policy and legislation reform. The initiative originated in June 2020, with Black IBMers and allies creating an internal IBM program called the Call for Code Emb(race) Challenge.

By February 2021, seven projects had been open sourced—shared online so that others can contribute their code and enhance them. Among them is Five Fifths Voter, a web app designed to help minorities exercise their right to vote by determining optimal voting strategies and limiting suppression issues. Another app, Legit-Info, helps individuals understand how local legislation can have significant impacts on areas as far-reaching as jobs, the environment and safety.

The Call for Code Initiative was created in 2018 by David Clark Cause and founding partner IBM, joined by United Nations Human Rights and the Linux Foundation. Participants build applications on open source–powered software, including Red Hat OpenShift®, IBM Cloud®, IBM Watson®, IBM Blockchain, atmospheric data from IBM’s Weather Company and resources from ecosystem partners. Winning teams of the Call for Code Global Challenge receive $200,000 and support from IBM Service Corps, technical experts and ecosystem partners to incubate their technology, open source their code and deploy their solution in communities around the world.

The initiative’s 2021 Global Challenge seeks solutions that combat climate change in three focus areas: clean water and sanitation, zero hunger, and responsible production and green consumption. Learn more and join the effort at callforcode.org.

Headshot of Ruth Davis

We are so excited to receive the enthusiastic support of the open source community and our ecosystem of partners across our Call for Code work, helping us drive progress and leverage technology to combat racial injustice and climate change.

Ruth Davis

IBM Director of Call for Code

Headshot of Ruth Davis

We are so excited to receive the enthusiastic support of the open source community and our ecosystem of partners across our Call for Code work, helping us drive progress and leverage technology to combat racial injustice and climate change.

Ruth Davis

IBM Director of Call for Code

Solution for small farmers

Farmer using the Agrolly app on a tablet to monitor crop development

Agrolly has provided hands-on training to more than 500 rural farmers using the app.

The 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge winner was Agrolly, an app designed to provide small rural farmers with affordable access to AI-powered data and insights about weather patterns and crop characteristics, as well as advice on what to grow—and how and when to grow it.

The Agrolly team includes developers from Brazil, India, Mongolia and Taiwan who have seen firsthand the effects that climate change was having on their communities. They have already provided hands-on training to more than 500 rural farmers using the app, and are working with IBM Service Corps on a deployment plan to improve and test their technology in 2021.

Farmer using the Agrolly app on a tablet to monitor crop development

Agrolly has provided hands-on training to more than 500 rural farmers using the app.